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September 12, 2018 Holly Hunt

In the lead up to the launch of the inaugural Women in Digital Awards Gala in 2018 our Founder and CEO, Holly Tattersall sat down the Janis Chu from F Magazine.

“The industry holds incredible opportunities for women. Not only are there a growing number of opportunities, they are well paid and often facilitate all important flexible working arrangements that allow mums to stay engaged in the workforce.” – Holly Tattersall



September 4, 2018 Holly Hunt

You just announced the relaunch of Collective Hub – congrats! What can we expect?

One thing I know for sure – taking the time to “break the brand” to “remake” it was the best thing (apart from starting it) that I have ever done! What I also know for sure is that our purpose remains stronger than ever “to ignite human potential”. As far as what the deliverables look like – we are still working through that – but expect a lot more digital content and a lot more face to face events.

What does your day-in-the-life generally look like?

No one day is the same. I run multiple content verticals across multiple geographic locations with a very decentralized team working from all over the world. So it really depends on the focus at the time – be it an event series we’re rolling out, or a tour that I am putting together (or delivering) or a multitude of other channels. My days could involve photo shoots, interviews, strategy, planning, visioning. These days every day also includes very consciously and purposefully “time and space” for me to think and be and recreate. I love moving forward.

How do you de-stress from a busy work day?

Consciously making time for not negotiables – exercise, good food. Time to seek, listen, education myself, explore and get into nature. Time with my partner and my Cavoodle Benny in nature or by the sea is bliss.

Where’s your favourite place to visit when you’re in need of inspiration?

No one place. In fact when I truly need inspiration I put myself in very counterintuitive places. I’ll purposefully go somewhere I’ve never been – be it a different suburb, coffee shop, retail store or a myriad of other things. I think if you are open and you hold your purpose close – there is inspiration and opportunities in abundance and sometimes from the most unexpected places and spaces.

What’s your go-to breakfast before a big day?

Big green smoothie packed with baby spinach, nuts, half a banana and 2 dates. YUM – fills me up and I’m starting the day right!

Name one thing that intimidates you?

Nothing.

We know you value work-life balance and embracing a healthy lifestyle. To what extent do you feel it contributes to productivity and/or innovation?

My health is my absolute number one not negotiable priority. Without it, we have nothing.

Name three women who inspire you.

We’ve done over 6000 interviews in Collective Hub print mag and online over the past five years. The pages are FILLED with inspirational women – it’s too tricky to drill down to three…

Do you have one motto or inspiring quote that has stuck with you over the years?

“Here’s to the Crazy Ones…” Steve Jobs

“The art of doing more with less.” This really resonates with us. How could this idea be applied to digital, and in particular disruptive digital ideas?

The ability to scale tapping into digital resources is unparalleled. Be it social or a myriad of apps and tools that are now available. As my team is decentralized and in multiple locations we use digital technology and tools every day to time save. We can also automate so much now using technology. I could write an entire book (and probably will) on how technological advances have helped us to be more productive and efficient.

What are you feelings or attitudes towards artificial intelligence?

I think all technological advances are good and exciting when used in an ethical and educated way. Like anything it’s about education and understanding the limitations and risks associated.

Why do you feel groups and awards such as Women in Digital are important?

I think so often we glorify being “busy” and we don’t take the time to stop and acknowledge our achievements. I think it’s beautiful to a) take the time to acknowledge yourself and use this as an opportunity to capture and document the legacy of what you’ve achieved to date. And secondly I think it’s really wonderful to give visibility to so many extraordinary businesses and individuals. We can all learn from one another and it’s great to shine the light on so many wonderful innovations, entrepreneurs and business leaders.

How important is it for women in the digital industry to support each other?

I am a strong believer that all of us – no matter our gender, race, industry or geographic location should support each other and lift one another higher. I am all about reciprocity, abundance and collaboration. There is enough room for everyone.

What would you want to tell young women starting out now?

Have an insatiable self-belief. And just know that anything you can dream is possible. This I know for sure.

Lisa, you truly are a force in your field. Any last words?

Just start. 

‘Do you know an industry leader, innovative thinker, motivator or bad-ass boss lady? Nominate now for The Women in Digital Awards’



June 4, 2018 Holly Hunt

In a world where technology is as much a part of your daily ritual as your toothbrush, digital really is a girl’s best friend. From the moment we wake up our days are dominated by interactions with apps, programs and devices, modern accessibilities that most of us couldn’t imagine living without.

Not only has the digital era redefined the meaning of convenience, ongoing innovations in technology have also established new and continually expanding job markets, in turn creating a wealth of novel career paths.

One woman who has paved her professional journey in the rise of the tech revolution is Margarita Camus, Digital Innovation Lead at Queensland Urban Utilities. A regular guest speaker and contributor within the digital innovation, marketing and technology industries, as well as a mentor for the Women in Digital mentorship program, Camus knows more than a thing or two about the ever-evolving digital landscape.

Here, we speak to her about everything a tech-savvy woman needs to know about building a career in the digital landscape.

Women in Digital: What does the digital era mean to you?

Margarita Camus: The digital era is the new way of life. As a digital professional it’s about constantly navigating the ever-changing industry so we can make sure we’re meeting customers’ expectations, creating efficiencies and adding value.

WID: How does digital affect your day-to-day?

MC: Digital is all around us, and is especially engrained in my life as a tech professional. I wake up to an alarm on my smartphone, use a smart toothbrush that syncs with my phone, and tell my Google Home to play my favourite morning playlist – all before I’ve had breakfast!

That being said, when I get home from work it’s important for me to put my phone down and enjoy a meal, spend quality time with my family and friends, or make it to a yoga class. Digital can make a very positive impact on a person’s life, but at the end of the day we are still human and need to know when to disconnect and be present.

WID: Throughout your career you have worked in digital strategy, digital marketing and project management for a diverse range of brands across different industries. What has working across these different sectors taught you about the flexibility of digital marketing?

MC: I have been lucky enough to work on incredible projects with some of the world’s biggest brands, including Nestle and UNIQLO. Working for one of Australia’s largest water companies is an incredible challenge and I’m really enjoying working in a more innovation-focused digital role [where] I get to push the boundaries and explore new technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) and bots, to see how they can add value to our customers’ digital experience.

Each brand you work with can have a completely different approach to digital, and it’s been invaluable to my career to have a wide breadth of experience; I think getting digital experience across a range of industries is one of the best things you can do early in your career.

WID: What are the most important professional skills required to thrive in the digital era?

MC: I would say the best digital professionals genuinely love technology, have curious personalities, enjoy learning and want to solve complex problems. Digital is constantly changing and you have to keep up with new technological advancements and user trends that change almost on a daily basis, so it’s not something you can do without a significant time investment.

WID: In 2014, Queensland Urban Utilities introduced a ‘Women in Leadership’ Group to promote and harness the potential of women within the organisation. Can you tell us more about how Queensland Urban Utilities is currently working towards improving female representation in the digital realm?

MC: Joining the Women in Digital pledge represents our commitment to supporting diversity within digital teams at Queensland Urban Utilities. We are also involved in other initiatives, including Work180 and Diversity Council of Australia, which promote diversity across the organisation.

I’m very proud to say our digital team is gender balanced and we have tailored sourcing strategies to attract top digital talent from all industries, backgrounds and sectors.

WID: In the digital realm, do you feel there are currently equal opportunities for both men and women?

MC: It’s widely acknowledged that diverse teams are more productive and profitable and it’s great to see more organisations recognising this and pushing this movement, especially in the digital industry, which can often be very male dominated. It’s not just the right thing to do, but organisations will be left behind if they don’t prioritise diversity.

Diversity is more than just [about] gender. There are a range of other factors that organisations need to consider including diversity of ethnicity, socioeconomic status, language, religion, sexual orientation, and geographical area. I also think diversity of experiences and viewpoints are important, as it provides more holistic ways of looking at organisational challenges.

WID: What role do you think analogue communication plays in our digital world? Do you feel there are some business practices and forms of communication that cannot be digitised?

MC: Absolutely – at the end of the day digital isn’t just about technology or processes, at its core it’s really about people. I’m passionate about events like hackathons, as they provide a great opportunity to break down silos and encourage diverse teams to think about digital challenges in new ways. The magic behind a hack happens through human interaction. Plus, they are great fun!

WID: What do you love most about what you do?

MC: I love working with a passionate team, and working for an industry that does so much for our community and environment. I’m supported by an incredible team that believes in my ideas and constantly encourages me to push boundaries. It’s really refreshing. 

WID: What piece of advice would you give to women who aspire to work in the digital realm?

MC: I’d encourage them to build a great network and find a mentor to support them on their professional journey. There are so many digital events and activities across Australia that can help you to connect with like-minded people.

WID: What’s one app you can’t live without?

MC: There are a few! I recently converted to using an Apple watch and I really enjoy the activity tracker to keep me active. I also plan my life on Evernote and couldn’t live without it.



March 10, 2018 Holly Hunt

When Michael Reid, State Manager of Cisco QLD moved to Brisbane after several years in Sydney he was astounded by the lack of diversity available within the Brisbane technology market. Not only were there fewer women within his team at Cisco, he found that any jobs advertised weren’t attracting the diverse talent he sought.

With around 10% gender diversity in his team, and fewer than 5% female applicants for his role, he was struggling why it was so hard to attract great talent at a company known for its employer of choice status. Unfortunately, Michael’s experience was an all too familiar one which was somewhat comforting and troubling to find out!

Sally-Ann Williams, Engineering Community & Outreach Manager for Google Australia says that women comprise only 3 per cent of applications to study IT at university, “yet we know that 75 per cent of all future jobs will require STEM skills and the vast majority of them are technical skills’’.

Not one to shy away from a problem, Michael wanted to know what actions he could take to improve the issue.

With this in mind, we discussed how important it is to:

  • Support community organisations like Girls Who Code, Tech Girls are Superheroes and of course, Women in Digital,
  • Create unique pathways for women to enter the industry,
  • Speak at local high schools and universities about careers in Digital and IT,
  • Champion women in the industry to ensure role models were visible for other young girls and women. After all, you can’t be what you can’t see.

With an open mind, Michael decided to create an entry level opportunity that would allow him to recruit a talented and ambitious young woman into the company from the Women in Digital network.

Michael ended up hiring one of the first women we introduced to him,  and almost 12 months later, she continues to make a great contribution to the culture and diversity within the QLD team – something we’re proud to have facilitated through Women in Digital.