Find out what we have been up to in the community.

Interested in having a member of Women in Digital speaker at your event? For all speaking, press or media enquiries, please send us an email.



August 4, 2019 Elise Le-Galloudec

Inspired. Motivated. Focused. Three words summarising how I felt walking out after two days at the Liquid Learning, Women in ICT and Digital Leadership Summit 2019.

I’m Emma Judd, Group Marketing Manager at Place Design Group and I was the lucky winner of the Women in Digital LinkedIn competition, to attend this Summit from July 23 2019 to July 24 2019.

You may have seen, I took over the @womenindigital Instagram Stories for the duration of the conference and can view my stories on their highlights here.

While it was two days jam packed with an amazing line up of speakers, the below will give you a brief insight and share some knowledge nuggets and relatable advice I personally took from this event.

DAY 1: 23 July

On day one of the summit we heard from some fantastic speakers, with the line-up including:

  • Joanna Murray, Program Manager, Transformation & Innovation, Boral
  • Chris Locke, Chief Information Officer, Flight Centre
  • Deb Assheton, Expert Facilitator, The Amplify Group
  • Wendy Bryant, Chief Information Officer, Transport for NSW
  • Keli Saville, Regional Head of Data, AsiaPac, Vanguard
  • Niamh Collins, General Manager, Digital, HFC
  • Jade Carson, Director, IT Investments, Department of Education & Training
  • Kirsty McKay, Group Manager, Program Delivery & Digital Transformation, Coates Hire
  • Katie Payten, Director, Technology Assurance & Governance, Australian Securities & Investments Commission
  • Kylie McLean, Chief Digital Officer, Australia & New Zealand, IBM
  • Simon Noonan, Chief Information Officer, SportsBet

The first day, first speaker at a conference is always exciting and generally sets the tone for what you can expect and Joanna Murray, Program Manager, Transformation & Innovation at Boral, did just that.

Setting us up for the day, Joanne asked us to reflect back to the start of our careers. Did we know what we wanted to be, and how we planned to get there? I know myself. I definitely had a plan and thought it would go a certain way but reflecting back, it was actually a very different path I’d taken. I think this is a really positive thought to reflect on, especially if you are a mentor or in a leadership role guiding your team through their career journey.

Favourite quote from Joanne’s presentation was, “Great leaders don’t think they’re great; great leaders think they’re human.”

From career reflection, to career reflecting. Chris Locke, Chief Information Officer, Flight Centre, shared some great career advice which I’ve shared below:

  • Don’t be afraid of trying different things in different industries
  • Make a plan and make it happen
  • Be resilient, but patient
  • Get experience – think outside the square

This was also a lovely flow into the third speaker, Deb Assheton, Expert Facilitator, The Amplify Group, who spoke on the importance of true self confidence, the value of vulnerability and gratitude along with self-awareness.

A nice reminder that Deb left us with was that the struggle ends where gratitude begins. Practicing daily gratitude makes us 5-10% happier, and costs us nothing.

“What are you grateful for today?”

I think one of my favourite, most thought-provoking parts of the day was Wendy Bryant’s presentation. Wendy Bryant, Chief Information Officer, Transport for NSW, spoke on ‘Unconscious Bias’. To explain this, Wendy made this really relatable asking us all to discuss at our tables if there were any roles we automatically associate with a man or a woman; knowing perfectly well that both genders actually worked in that particular role. For example, when one thinks of a pilot, a doctor, a nurse or a kindergarten teacher, does one stereotype to a particular gender? Needless to say, most people, by default of unconscious bias, did so.

Wendy also reflected on her time as the only woman in an IT team working with all men. She refused to be the ‘cake cutter’ at workplace celebrations, as the default was to ‘leave it to Wendy because she was the woman’. Reflecting on our own workplaces, I feel there is so much that can be consciously done or implemented to improve this default gender bias. Some ideas Wendy shared with us included:

  • Unconscious bias training
  • Focus on bias in AI – change your Siri voice to male
    • I found this topic extremely interesting. Here is an article from Google that discusses it in more detail.
  • Specific actions on diversity in hiring processes and opportunities

Post lunch, we returned to the room for a panel discussion on ‘Whether work-life balance is possible?’. And great news – it is! And here are the panellists’ top tips for making it happen:

  • Find what works for you. If you play a sport or enjoy gym as an outlet – prioritise that and make a routine that works.
  • Plan holidays in advance and stick to them – If you’re busy, it’s easy to not plan your downtime, but time with family and friends is important. Book it in. Booking it in advance gives you something to look forward to.
  • Don’t hesitate to raise your hand if you need help. A great tip. Learn to delegate and ask those around you for help when needed.
  • Work smarter using smarter working techniques. Again something to Google, but what it comes down to is the fact that we all have 24 hours in a day. Use them wisely. The one thing money can’t buy is time.
  • As women in leadership, WE need to support flexibility. This is so important. If your team comes to you wanting to discuss flexible working options, be the change. Listen to their request and see what may be possible.
  • Flexibility in the workplace. Break down the barriers and become outcomes based. This is such a positive and practical way to frame this thought process, as just because someone sits at their desk all day, it doesn’t mean they are being any more productive than someone working from home. Change the focus to be on outcomes, not on number of hours sitting at a desk, and encourage flexible working arrangements.

The final two presenters for day one, Kylie McLean, Chief Digital Officer, Australia & New Zealand, IBM and Simon Noonan, Chief Information Officer, SportsBet, touched on workplace culture. Kylie really drove home the message that as leaders, it’s so important to create a culture that gets your team to thrive. This was a fantastic leeway into Simon’s Case Study around transforming workplace culture, with SportsBet as an example. Honestly, SportsBet sounds like an amazing place to work with a fantastic culture. Guided by their purpose, underpinned by their values, SportsBet don’t just have their values hung on the wall; they live their values, which makes all the difference.

DAY 2: 24 July

Inspired from day one, excited for day two and it did not disappoint. The fantastic line-up of speakers included:

  • Stuart Harrison, Chief Information Security Officer, Medibank
  • Megan James, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Data Centres & President, Women in IT & Communications
  • Arabella Macpherson, Founder & Communications Coach, Resonate Communications
  • Jade Carson, Director IT Investments, Department of Education & Training
  • Brendan Mills, Chief Information Officer, NIB Health Funds Limited
  • Sarah McCullough, Head of eTech Operations, Essential Energy
  • Kathryn Porter, Director, Customer Experience, Cisco
  • Joyce Harkness, Chief Information Officer, Avant Mutual Group Limited
  • Kirsten Murray, Director International, Faculty of Engineering & IT, University of Technology Sydney
  • Catherine Nolan, Director & Principal Coach, Gender Gap Gone

Stuart Harrison, Chief Information Security Officer, Medibank, kicked-off day two proceedings sharing some words of wisdom around realising your leadership potential. A key theme that came through reflecting on day one was to show vulnerability. As leaders, you do need to stay strong for your team, but vulnerability is not a sign of weakness, but a sign that you are human. Showing vulnerability can often lead to building rapport and relationships with your team. A really lovely reminder for all leaders.

From the importance of vulnerability in leadership, to the importance of resilience as leaders. Resilience was the topic Megan James, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Data Centres & President, Women in IT & Communications, covered in her personal career journey she shared with attendees. Megan is a very inspirational woman, and since the conference, I have shared parts of her story with many of my colleagues. They say you may not remember what people say, but you will always remember how they made you feel. In this case, I remembered what Megan said because of how it made me feel and how much it resonated. If you get the opportunity to hear Megan speak, I would highly recommend you take it and hear her story first hand. I will share my key takeaways from Megan’s presentation below and hope you take some inspiration from this too:

  • Stay in your lane and stand up for what you believe in – no matter what
  • Always hold true to your values – above all else
  • Value your soft skills – emotional intelligence
  • Be present and always show up
  • Everyone has a story – so listen
  • Engage with people – see how you get the best out of people – allow creative opportunity
  • Don’t compromise on any of the above

As leaders and mentors, it’s always useful to have references or tools to provide the best possible guidance and advice to enable meaningful conversations with your teams and mentees. Arabella Macpherson, Founder & Communications Coach, Resonate Communications shared with us some great tips around unleashing your power as a mentor. I’ve summarised them below:

  • Coaching
    • Ask questions
    • Make suggestions
    • Share experiences
  • Chunking
    • Use chunking to open up or delve deeper on topics
  • Matching
    • Give all of your attention
    • Match 60%: physically and vocally
    • Repeat words and phrases back to show acknowledgement

Towards the end of day two, the discussion changed to be more around the future of work. Jade Carson, Director IT Investments, Department of Education & Training, spoke passionately on the topic of engaging and attracting future female leaders to IT roles.

Some ideas and strategies Jade touched on started right back at engaging young girls to show interest in IT. Whether that be at home, at school or at play. It’s also about attracting girls and women to a career in IT by changing the image/perception of tech, promoting meaningful careers and addressing the unconscious bias. On top of this, growing the focus on the culture around tech, closing the confidence gap through training and education and having strong female mentors or sponsors will help attract female IT talent. Jade concluded that we should keep a focus on culture being equitable and reflective of diversity. And that job design or redesign for flexibility is important. Overarching, she highlighted female role models across the IT industry is key.

Continuing the future of work discussion, panelists’ thoughts covered:

  • The importance of business and IT partnerships – with the increase in technologies in the workplace, it’s important for businesses and IT leaders to work closely for the best possible outcomes
  • Portfolio careers – showing depth and breadth of experience
  • Being location agnostic – it’s not about where you’re physically working from. With technology you are enabled to work from anywhere. This also ties in to the earlier discussion around being outcomes focused.
  • Gig Economy – presents great opportunities but also new challenges

And that’s a wrap! Catherine Nolan, Director & Principal Coach, Gender Gap Gone,

was our facilitator across the two-day summit and presented a great summary of the insights from across the event. A few practical tips she left us with included:

  • Create a Vision Board – use Pinterest or Canva to get started. If you see it, you’ll achieve it.
  • Create your 40-page resume – a dumping ground for YOU only. List examples as they happen so when the time comes, you have the content and are ready to apply for that dream job.
  • Watch the Amy Cuddy Ted Talk – ‘Your body language may shape who you are’

There were honestly so many fantastic insights and inspirational moments over the two days. I hope this blog post shares just some of that post-summit magic with you all.

Thank you for reading.

Emma Judd

Instagram: @emajudd

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emajudd/

Do you have more insightful leadership tips? Share them in the comments below.



September 4, 2018 Holly Hunt

You just announced the relaunch of Collective Hub – congrats! What can we expect?

One thing I know for sure – taking the time to “break the brand” to “remake” it was the best thing (apart from starting it) that I have ever done! What I also know for sure is that our purpose remains stronger than ever “to ignite human potential”. As far as what the deliverables look like – we are still working through that – but expect a lot more digital content and a lot more face to face events.

What does your day-in-the-life generally look like?

No one day is the same. I run multiple content verticals across multiple geographic locations with a very decentralized team working from all over the world. So it really depends on the focus at the time – be it an event series we’re rolling out, or a tour that I am putting together (or delivering) or a multitude of other channels. My days could involve photo shoots, interviews, strategy, planning, visioning. These days every day also includes very consciously and purposefully “time and space” for me to think and be and recreate. I love moving forward.

How do you de-stress from a busy work day?

Consciously making time for not negotiables – exercise, good food. Time to seek, listen, education myself, explore and get into nature. Time with my partner and my Cavoodle Benny in nature or by the sea is bliss.

Where’s your favourite place to visit when you’re in need of inspiration?

No one place. In fact when I truly need inspiration I put myself in very counterintuitive places. I’ll purposefully go somewhere I’ve never been – be it a different suburb, coffee shop, retail store or a myriad of other things. I think if you are open and you hold your purpose close – there is inspiration and opportunities in abundance and sometimes from the most unexpected places and spaces.

What’s your go-to breakfast before a big day?

Big green smoothie packed with baby spinach, nuts, half a banana and 2 dates. YUM – fills me up and I’m starting the day right!

Name one thing that intimidates you?

Nothing.

We know you value work-life balance and embracing a healthy lifestyle. To what extent do you feel it contributes to productivity and/or innovation?

My health is my absolute number one not negotiable priority. Without it, we have nothing.

Name three women who inspire you.

We’ve done over 6000 interviews in Collective Hub print mag and online over the past five years. The pages are FILLED with inspirational women – it’s too tricky to drill down to three…

Do you have one motto or inspiring quote that has stuck with you over the years?

“Here’s to the Crazy Ones…” Steve Jobs

“The art of doing more with less.” This really resonates with us. How could this idea be applied to digital, and in particular disruptive digital ideas?

The ability to scale tapping into digital resources is unparalleled. Be it social or a myriad of apps and tools that are now available. As my team is decentralized and in multiple locations we use digital technology and tools every day to time save. We can also automate so much now using technology. I could write an entire book (and probably will) on how technological advances have helped us to be more productive and efficient.

What are you feelings or attitudes towards artificial intelligence?

I think all technological advances are good and exciting when used in an ethical and educated way. Like anything it’s about education and understanding the limitations and risks associated.

Why do you feel groups and awards such as Women in Digital are important?

I think so often we glorify being “busy” and we don’t take the time to stop and acknowledge our achievements. I think it’s beautiful to a) take the time to acknowledge yourself and use this as an opportunity to capture and document the legacy of what you’ve achieved to date. And secondly I think it’s really wonderful to give visibility to so many extraordinary businesses and individuals. We can all learn from one another and it’s great to shine the light on so many wonderful innovations, entrepreneurs and business leaders.

How important is it for women in the digital industry to support each other?

I am a strong believer that all of us – no matter our gender, race, industry or geographic location should support each other and lift one another higher. I am all about reciprocity, abundance and collaboration. There is enough room for everyone.

What would you want to tell young women starting out now?

Have an insatiable self-belief. And just know that anything you can dream is possible. This I know for sure.

Lisa, you truly are a force in your field. Any last words?

Just start. 

‘Do you know an industry leader, innovative thinker, motivator or bad-ass boss lady? Nominate now for The Women in Digital Awards’



December 14, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

By Sejal Jamnadas

A new year calls for a fresh new outlook on the tech landscape ahead of us. 2017 was the year of de-mystifying buzz words of techblockchain, augmented and virtual reality, artificial intelligence, bots and IoT. Of course, these technologies are no longer a “trend” or an idealistic future state. Professionals across all industries, from legal, accounting, tech, arts and manufacturing are now required to be well-versed in a basic understanding of the concept and its application.

Looking into 2018, the tech itself is not going to be vastly different or revolutionary. Rather, as the tech becomes more intuitive, we now need to filter the noise of buzzwords and actually ensure the tech is relevant for people and organisations. The trend will be to better understand the application of these technologies through experimentation, prototyping, refinement and ultimately ensuring the platforms align 100% with the company’s vision. In short, institutions will be constantly obsessing over humans; creating value by ensuring their workers and customers are more satisfied.

The coming year will be about experimenting with wild possibilities, but also understanding how the core principles underlying block chain, virtual reality, cognitive computing and e-commerce will transform our experience of work and consumption.

Here are my Top 4 trends for 2018:

1. BLOCKCHAIN

Blockchain has long been (mostly just the last 5 years) the “star-studded techn trend”, best known for its underlying foundation for cryptocurrencies. If you haven’t invested in bitcoin or ethereum yourself, then you probably have a colleague that will boaster about their massive gains (or losses) as they check its market value on their phone every 10 minutes. Blockchain, simply put, is a distributed ledger that provides a way for information to be recorded and shared by a community. Beyond the popular hype of cryptocurrency, the impact on workflow processes, agreements and tasks have the potential to revolutionise supply chains. Nowadays with blockchain, it’s possible to track back products to the origin of raw material used, quickly determine supply, time-to-customer and exchange confidential business information from orders, shipping and contractual documents.

The next wave of change may not necessarily be centred around the shiny aura of speculative bitcoin trading. Rather, blockchain will shine again for its transformative benefits in an organisation’s most costly, laborious and outdated departments

2. AUGMENTED REALITY

Until now, we’ve mostly seen augmented reality (AR) delivered through our phones; Snapchat filters and Pokémon Go are the perfect example of simple mainstreams applications of an otherwise complex technology. While trying on puppy dog filters on Snapchat might seem relatively trivial, Snapchat’s inherent ability to process and interact with data through multiple mediums opens doors to a myriad of exciting applications. AR is the concept of overlaying contextual information on the immediate physical environment before our eyes, blending digital components and experiences with real life. The technology has become part of products itself, from viewing AR instructions for the maintenance of a hydraulic valve, to visualising the X-ray of a car’s engine and undercarriage. Beyond products, AR will dramatically improve performance across an organisation’s value chain, particularly in the areas of communication and collaboration, training and simulation and the re-invention of end-user customer experience.

AR will further become an imperative as society tries to address the fundamental disconnect between the wealth of digital data and the physical world of ‘people and things’. Torrents of data produced by billions of smart, connect products won’t nearly be as useful as extracting them onto a 3-dimensional medium and allowing humans to experience a new form of information processing.

3. COGNITIVE COMPUTING

Cognitive computing, used interchangeability with artificial intelligence, instantly brings to mind the sea of uniform silver robots in the 2004 Will Smith movie iRobot. The closest we ever really got to seeing human-like robots is the baby robot which greets customers outside of Tokyo’s flagship UNIQLO store. The qualities of these idealistic robots, however, have already had promising applications in manufacturing, professional services, agriculture and health care. Cognitive computing comprises of technology platforms which process information and mimics the human brain to reason, predict and make decisions.

The challenge going forward will be to make non-machine judgements on how we manage the impacts of a displaced workforce and ensure our judiciary, policy-making and education system factor in a future shared with machines that continue to learn.

4. E-COMMERCE

E-commerce is nothing new, but it continues to disrupt business models and consumer behaviours at an unprecedented rate. In 2018, e-commerce will be a magic brewing pot of augmented reality, virtual reality, cognitive chat bots, digital marketing, optimised and traceable supply chains, delivery drones, mobile platforms and personalisation through data. The recent intrusion of Amazon in Australia appears to be the classic trigger for consumer goods markets that are re-visiting their entire company vision.

The focus on customers will be a critical objective for all retailers, whether they play purely e-commerce, or a hybrid with brick-and-mortar stores. The competitive advantage won’t be in the number of technology platforms available, rather it will be that one time you spoke to a friendly customer assistant that offered you credit for the late delivery of your parcel.

Don’t believe everything the internet tells you

My tech trends for 2018 will definitely not be the same tech trends as thousands of other individuals and organisations that present their own research and points of view. What tech trend have you read about the most? More importantly, what intrigues you the most?

Check out some of my top references for staying on top of tech:

Deloitte Tech Trends 2018

Medium



December 11, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

Have you ever watched the TV series called House?

It was a very popular long running medical TV drama based on a main character by the name of Dr. Gregory House. His specialty was correctly diagnosing and treating patients with diseases which were often missed and incorrectly diagnosed by other doctors.

Fast forward to 2017 and a tech company has now developed a computer system that can do the same thing.

How clever is this computer system? The following real life examples are just the start and we genuinely think it is set to save millions of lives around the world.

Rare Diseases

Rare diseases are generally defined as diseases that affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people. As there are around 7,000 rare diseases worldwide, there are estimates that 350 million people worldwide are living with some form of rare disease. In Australia, an estimated 6% – 8% of the population are affected.

Rare diseases, despite its name, are a serious problem for millions of people. In many instances, these diseases are difficult to diagnose and have similar medical symptoms compared to more common diseases. It is not unexpected that doctors do misdiagnose patients since it is impossible even for the most experienced doctor to know all the symptoms for 7,000 rare diseases.

This is where this tech company’s big data artificial intelligence medical diagnosis system becomes incredibly valuable. In fact, what took Dr. House days or weeks to diagnose, this computer system can do the same in real life within minutes. Let’s look at some recent examples:

1. Rare Leukemia

A patient was admitted to a Japanese hospital and initially diagnosed by doctors with a type of blood cancer called acute myeloid leukemia. The initial treatment appeared to work but her recovery was slower than expected which led the doctors to suspect something else was happening.

The doctors consulted the big data computer medical system which had read and interpreted tens of millions of medical papers on cancer. They provided the system with the patient’s records and genetic data. The system then identified gene mutations in the patient that are unique to a specific rare form secondary leukemia different to the initial diagnosis and she was then successfully treated. Doctors said it would have taken humans perhaps 2 weeks to come to the same correct diagnosis.

It took this big data medical computer system 10 minutes. The system has since gone on to help diagnose many more illnesses in the same hospital.

2. Rare Disease Centre

In a rare disease centre within a German hospital, there is a 6,000 person long waiting list where some patients have been seen previously by up to 40 doctors that have not been able to properly diagnose them. The hospital has recently started using the same computer system to help provide desperately needed answers for these patients.

In an initial trial, doctors randomly selected some past patient records and fed them into the computer system as a test. The system correctly identified the top possibilities for the diseases these patients had. It was all completed in a manner of seconds.

This computer system has great potential to improve healthcare for millions of lives around the world and in many cases also save those lives with earlier diagnosis. Do you know which tech company has spent years developing this big data computer system?

Of course, this company is IBM and it owns Watson, its artificial intelligence business. As you may well know, IBM was one of the pioneers of the personal computer as well as large, business focused computing.

This article was submitted by AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com).

To learn more about Big Data and other mega world trends, CLICK HERE.

AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com) is a global equities fund manager that makes it easy for anyone to invest in the world’s most transforming trends such as Big Data. For more investing insights and to learn about the listed international companies benefitting from these trends, Register For A Free Trial Here.

The information does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs. You should consider if the relevant investment is appropriate having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Disclaimer: Atlastrend Pty Ltd (ABN 83 605 565 491) is a Corporate Authorised Representative (No. 001233660) of Fundhost Limited (ABN 69 092 517 087, AFS License No. 233045). Any advice contained in this communication is general advice only. None of the information provided is, or should be considered to be, personal financial advice. The content has been prepared without taking into account your personal objectives, financial situations or needs. If you consider it necessary you should seek your own advice before making any financial or investment decisions. The information provided in this communication is believed to be accurate at the time of writing. None of Atlastrend Pty Ltd, Fundhost Limited or their related entities nor their respective officers and agents accept responsibility for any inaccuracy in, or any actions taken in reliance upon, that information.

Any managed investment fund product (Fund) mentioned in this communication is offered at www.atlastrend.com via a Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) which will contain all the details of the offer. The PDS is issued by Fundhost Limited as responsible entity for the investment fund products. Before making any decision to make or hold any investment in a Fund you should consider the PDS in full. The PDS is available at www.atlastrend.com or by calling AtlasTrend on 1800 589 778. Investment returns are not guaranteed. Past performance is not an indicator of future performance.



November 1, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

Amazon is setting up shop in Australia, isn’t that great for consumers?

It’s happening. Amazon has officially confirmed it is setting up an online shop in Australia. This is great news for many Aussies who right now can only buy through offshore Amazon online stores (e.g. in the U.S.) with much higher delivery fees and longer delivery times to Australia.

There are reports Amazon will also offer prices up to 30% cheaper than local stores. Combined with the Amazon Prime delivery (a yearly fixed fee for unlimited free priority shipping as well as access to Netflix competitor, Amazon Prime Video), consumers look set to be the big winners.

Why should Aussies worry about losing money?

Do you have any investment exposure to Australian retail companies?

This could be direct investment in listed shares or indirectly through your super fund. One of Australia’s largest retailers Wesfarmers (which owns Coles, Kmart, Target) alone has over half a million direct shareholders. The arrival of Amazon should be a concern for shareholders of Wesfarmers and other Aussie retailers.

Richard Goyder, the outgoing CEO of Wesfarmers, has gone as far as saying Amazon will “eat all our breakfasts, lunches and dinners” unless the retail sector innovates. The chart below clearly shows why he is right to be wary of Amazon’s disruptive power.

Aussie retailers will no doubt fight back. This may involve competing on price, providing much better customer service and properly investing in a world class online shopping experience.

The problem is this will cost money while Amazon will still increasingly capture market share. For example, investment bank Credit Suisse estimates companies such as JB-Hifi and Myer could lose a third to over half their earnings respectively in the coming years because of Amazon. This cannot be good news for their share prices.

That is why many Aussies may stand to lose more money from their investment exposure in Australian retailers than they’ll actually save from shopping at Amazon.

Is this an investment opportunity?

Yes. If you have any investment exposure to Australia retailers, it is time to take a good hard look at how they are responding to Amazon’s arrival. Some companies (like Wesfarmers) are investing in innovation to compete while others like Gerry Harvey (the billionaire chairman of Harvey Norman) take a more confrontational approach calling Amazon a parasite. (Read More)

The other opportunity to consider is an investment exposure to Amazon itself and the broader online shopping industry. You could do worse than start investing in a sector that will fundamentally transform the way society shops over the next decade.

This article was submitted by AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com).

At the time of writing, the AtlasTrend Online Shopping Spree Fund and the AtlasTrend Big Data Big Fund both own shares in Amazon.

To learn more about Online Shopping and other mega world trends, CLICK HERE.

 

AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com) is a global equities fund manager that makes it easy for anyone to invest in the world’s most transforming trends such as Online Shopping with exposure to companies like Amazon. To learn more, Register For A Free Trial Here.

The information does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs. You should consider if the relevant investment is appropriate having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Disclaimer: Atlastrend Pty Ltd (ABN 83 605 565 491) is a Corporate Authorised Representative (No. 001233660) of Fundhost Limited (ABN 69 092 517 087, AFS License No. 233045). Any advice contained in this communication is general advice only. None of the information provided is, or should be considered to be, personal financial advice. The content has been prepared without taking into account your personal objectives, financial situations or needs. If you consider it necessary you should seek your own advice before making any financial or investment decisions. The information provided in this communication is believed to be accurate at the time of writing. None of Atlastrend Pty Ltd, Fundhost Limited or their related entities nor their respective officers and agents accept responsibility for any inaccuracy in, or any actions taken in reliance upon, that information.

Any managed investment fund product (Fund) mentioned in this communication is offered at www.atlastrend.com via a Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) which will contain all the details of the offer. The PDS is issued by Fundhost Limited as responsible entity for the investment fund products. Before making any decision to make or hold any investment in a Fund you should consider the PDS in full. The PDS is available at www.atlastrend.com or by calling AtlasTrend on 1800 589 778. Investment returns are not guaranteed. Past performance is not an indicator of future performance.



October 29, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

Have you heard about big data recently?

It’s the use of clever software to analyse massive amounts of data. This then reveals patterns and trends which can predict how people will behave.

Chances are you have come across big data already. Remember the last time you were buying a plane ticket online and you were also shown hotel recommendations?

Before big data most of the hotel recommendations were probably not right for you (too far away, too small) because the website didn’t really know you. This is now changing with some online travel companies analysing millions of past transactions to predict what hotels you’ll book.

For example, their data might suggest customers (probably business travellers) who bought a single plane ticket during the middle of the day also stayed in nice hotels close to the city. So in the future anyone who fits this profile will only be offered well located 4 and 5 star hotels. This is big data at work.

Here are 3 ways we think big data will increasingly change how we live.

1.  Shopping

Every time you go shopping the retailer collects data about you. Overtime this data can be used to create a profile of who you are and predict what you would like to buy. How powerful is this data for retailers?

Here are some real life examples:

The big data program at Target in the US is so sophisticated it can predict if a customer is in their early stages of pregnancy. It then sends out offers on pregnancy products to these customers. This caused a situation one time when Target accidentally exposed a teenager’s pregnancy to her family. Oops!

Amazon is already great at using big data to recommend products to customers. It is going one step further and already thinking about sending products towards their customers’ locations before they have even bought it. In other words, Amazon thinks the future might not be that far off where they can predict what you would like to buy, even before you can.

Does this mean all the fun will be taken out of shopping?

Not really, we think retailers who use big data will have more loyal customers because they offer a better personalised service. Probably like going to your local café where your favourite barista always knows what drink you want from the menu.

2.  Health

Will big data be used to save lives?

Yes, it will. Big data is already being used to make large health services like hospitals operate more efficiently. The next step for big data is to prevent us from getting sick.

Apple recently agreed to allow users to share the health data collected by their iPhone or Apple Watch with IBM’s supercomputer Watson. All this data will then be analysed and used to provide better personalised programs for improving personal health.

How far will big data go to help us stay healthy? Well, there are already trials underway where medical centres are analysing large amounts of consumer credit card data to predict the chances of someone becoming ill. They will then use these predictions to help high risk patients lead a healthier lifestyle.

3.  Borrowing money

If you have borrowed money before from a bank you know the normal process. The bank asks you the usual questions about your salary and expenses. It makes sense, they want to make sure you can repay the loan.

Big data is starting to change this.

There are now systems that collect thousands of facts on borrowers. This is analysed to predict who the high risk borrowers are. Apparently people who move houses often or who fill out loan applications with just capital letters are statistically riskier borrowers.

In the near future, nearly everything a potential borrower has done might affect whether they can get a loan. So if we can leave you with one tip on big data, don’t use ALL CAPS if you need to fill out a loan application!

This article was submitted by AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com).

To learn more about Big Data and other mega world trends, CLICK HERE.

AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com) is a global equities fund manager that makes it easy for anyone to invest in the world’s most transforming trends such as Big Data. For more investing insights and to learn about the listed international companies benefitting from these trends, Register For A Free Trial Here.

The information does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs. You should consider if the relevant investment is appropriate having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Disclaimer: Atlastrend Pty Ltd (ABN 83 605 565 491) is a Corporate Authorised Representative (No. 001233660) of Fundhost Limited (ABN 69 092 517 087, AFS License No. 233045). Any advice contained in this communication is general advice only. None of the information provided is, or should be considered to be, personal financial advice. The content has been prepared without taking into account your personal objectives, financial situations or needs. If you consider it necessary you should seek your own advice before making any financial or investment decisions. The information provided in this communication is believed to be accurate at the time of writing. None of Atlastrend Pty Ltd, Fundhost Limited or their related entities nor their respective officers and agents accept responsibility for any inaccuracy in, or any actions taken in reliance upon, that information.

Any managed investment fund product (Fund) mentioned in this communication is offered at www.atlastrend.com via a Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) which will contain all the details of the offer. The PDS is issued by Fundhost Limited as responsible entity for the investment fund products. Before making any decision to make or hold any investment in a Fund you should consider the PDS in full. The PDS is available at www.atlastrend.com or by calling AtlasTrend on 1800 589 778. Investment returns are not guaranteed. Past performance is not an indicator of future performance.



October 24, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

By Sejal Jamnadas

Its hard to read the headlines these days without seeing something you would’ve seen in a futuristic sci-fi film from the early 2000s. Google and Amazon are revolutionising travel and logistics with their creations of drones and self-driving cars. Robot valet parking is well and truly a reality at the Dusseldorf airport in Germany. You can even have a robotic butler at Aloft hotel in San Francisco which delivers your towels, toothpastes and snacks. The prospect of a future where humans live with robots sounds exciting and luxurious, and would frankly allow us to do and think a lot less about life’s most mundane tasks. Despite the significant productivity advantages of robots, businesses and governments need to take a long hard look at how we will re-engineer the workforce to better collaborate with the new mechanical species.

Hello automation

What’s probably not making headlines are the far less glamorous robots, which are widespread in almost all industries. The type that create miniscule parts within car manufacturing plants, or the ‘invisible’ bots in software which automatically detect barcodes and analyses that information in a larger database. Robotic automation has already impacted jobs which are repetitive and rule-based, including manufacturing and white-collar professions within finance, procurement and customer service. In fact, the Committee of Economic Development of Australia predicts 40% of the current workforce, or five million jobs could be automated by 2035.

Since the arrival of cloud computing, one of the first professions to adopt this early stage of robotic automation has been accounting. Reconciliations are now done through robotic process automation (RPA) – software which mimics repetitive human activity. H&R Block this year announced its intention to help customers with tax deductions by partnering with IBM’s Watson robot, which has been trained on 74,000 pages of the US federal tax code. A May 2017 study by Telsyte revealed that 38% of large organisations (with more than 500 employees) have already adopted some form of RPA as a cornerstone of their digital transformation.

 The business case for robots

So what is so great about process automating robots? RPA has the ability to optimise the execution of business processes; a key strategic focus for many organisations. Enterprise tasks which are repetitive, require low-decision making and are commonly out-sourced, can now be executed more efficiently onshore with this technology. The benefits sound very compelling; RPA can improve accuracy, cycle time and cost per unit within critical departments such as finance and procurement, directly impacting the company’s bottom line. It’s hard to see a CFO turn down such a business proposal.

The Artificial Intelligence Spectrum (see below). developed by CognitiveScale, outlines how AI is adopted gradually in organisations. At a tactical level, rule-based systems are the norm within most industries. Even today, organisations that perform monotonous tasks manually are deemed to be highly inefficient. The story becomes more interesting as we move onto AI assistants and RPA which are transforming entire businesses processes. As for cognitive computing – well that’s a whole other dimension. Whilst implementation is not widespread, cognitive “digital brains” will completely disrupt how a business operates and delivers value to customers, creating new platforms and services which never exited before.

What about my job?

Process automation has a clear business value, however coupled with cognitive computing and machine learning, we could see a lot more professions displaced and the nature of work dramatically change. Sonia Eland, VP of DXC Technologies, argues that RPA will not take over all our work, as it will free humans to focus on judgement and analysis. Likewise, Deloitte partner Greg Haskins says that transactional processing will eventually become automated, forcing people to move up the capability curve. This means that traditionally costly internal operations in customer service, finance, procurement and administration can now become a strategic part of the business. The implications for employees, however, are a lot more complex.

A study into the German labour market (Dauth W, 2017), suggests the aggregate affect of robots in manufacturing and white-collar professions will increase labour productivity, however, it will also trigger slowing wage growth for low-to-medium skilled workers. Essentially, we could see a divide in the labour market, where highly-skilled workers continue to get richer, and low-skilled workers are forced to upskill, change careers or jump to the ‘gig economy’ where wage growth is even slower.

This is a classic oxymoron where the pursuit of economic growth through increased productivity and automation could actually lead to greater income inequality. The challenge for society now is to re-design how welfare systems and education programs will be delivered to a newly composed workforce. How can we re-distribute the benefits of productivity gains to displaced, low-skilled workers? What capabilities do the next generation need to gain employment and build innovative offerings that will compete on a global stage?

The Human Touch

If the dynamics of the labour market are managed properly, I definitely think we have an exciting future ahead with more challenging and interesting jobs (no more manual data entry please!). A 2017 survey by Deloitte Access Economics revealed that by 2030, “soft-skill intensive occupations” will account for 63% of all jobs in Australia. As such, beyond just technical skills, there will be growing importance for employees to demonstrate communication, problem-solving and creativity.

It’s time we become more relevant. It’s time to upskill and its time to find ways we can deliver more value within our organisations, address gaps and find ways to improve other people, processes and technology. And not because of the prospect of robots taking over the world, but because the dynamics of everything we know today will constantly change, and we need to be prepared.



October 16, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

By Kent Kwan, Co-founder of AtlasTrend

I’ve written previously about why big data is a mega investment trend. Click Here for some of those insights.

For this article, I would like to share with you a personal story about the remarkable power of big data and how it could save your life or the life of a loved one.

About 18 months ago, my daughter who had just turned 4 years old became ill. It didn’t start as anything unusual. She had a fever and was feeling tired without much of an appetite. If you are a parent, you’ll know young kids often pick up all sorts of viruses that lead to the same type of symptoms. A bit of Panadol and rest time usually fixes it.

Unfortunately, in my daughter’s case, she got worse. Actually, much worse.

Her high fever continued despite Panadol. A rash developed on her body, her joints began to ache, her lips started to bleed and her little hands and feet were starting to swell. She was in a tremendous amount of pain.

By this stage my wife and I had already taken our daughter to see her GP three times. On the third visit, her GP asked us to admit her to the children’s hospital as it wasn’t clear what was causing her illness.

After observations and tests to rule out other illnesses, the paediatricians diagnosed her with Kawasaki Disease which can be cured but must be treated within 10 days of the first symptoms occurring. Otherwise, there is a significant chance it can cause long term damage to the coronary arteries and potentially even death via a heart attack or internal bleeding.

Kawasaki Disease is relatively rare and has symptoms resembling many other more common non-life threatening childhood illnesses. It also can’t be diagnosed directly through any particular medical tests. As a result, there have been many unfortunate instances around the world where Kawasaki Disease sufferers have not been diagnosed correctly. Sadly, some with lifelong or even fatal consequences.

How is big data relevant to all of this?

Big data is the use of computing power to analyse huge amounts of data to provide useful insights. You’ll agree that doctors are smart but it isn’t fair to expect them to know about and be able to diagnose every single disease.

Imagine if a computer did know about every single disease in the world?

Not long ago, computers could only process structured data such as data in a table or spreadsheet. You could ask the computer to analyse that data but it couldn’t ever draw inferences or insights by itself. Well, that has changed. Computers with the right software can now interpret natural language texts (such as books and journals) and also draw inferences from what it reads.

A few years ago, IBM introduced the Watson big data analytics computer system to the world. In a case study of its big data analytics power, Watson (which presumably had “read” tens of thousands of pages of medical journals) was reportedly able to help doctors correctly diagnose a child with Kawasaki Disease within 24 hours with no invasive testing by analysing the symptoms using its big data knowledge base. The doctors who didn’t have use of IBM’s Watson for the same case didn’t arrive at a Kawasaki diagnosis for 6 days. For a disease that needs urgent treatment within 10 days of the symptoms first appearing, this could be the difference between life and death.

What does big data mean for healthcare for all of us?

The use of big data analytics to deliver vast improvements in healthcare is now starting to gain pace. Here are some more examples of big data at work in healthcare:

The American Cancer Society is working with IBM Watson’s computer to read countless health websites and medical research data to draw insights and advise cancer patients. The intention is to provide more personalised and better cancer patient care and treatments.

Healthcare companies such as Johnson & Johnson are using big data to significantly speed up medical drug development. Some reports suggest that what used to take Johnson & Johnson scientists years to analyse can now be done in a matter of days with IBM’s Watson. In a sign of how serious Johnson & Johnson and IBM view the future of big data in healthcare, the CEO of Johnson & Johnson recently joined IBM’s board of directors.

As for my daughter, she was very fortunate to have been correctly diagnosed and successfully treated for Kawasaki Disease within the 10 day treatment window. It was done without the use of big data analytics but she was lucky that her amazing doctors were on alert for this rare disease.

With greater use of big data analytics, I know luck will play a smaller part in the future for medical diagnosis and treatment for many diseases. Imagine a future when illnesses are not diagnosed and treated with the knowledge of just one or a few doctors but rather the knowledge of the entire medical profession around the world. This future is not too far away and is certainly something worthy of support and investment.

Yes, it might even save your life one day.

 

Read more about the mysterious Kawasaki Disease which to this day still has no known cause or diagnostic test Here.

For investment information about Australian’s only fully transparent managed fund dedicated to investing in big data companies, Click Here.

AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com) is a global equities fund manager that makes it easy for anyone to invest in the world’s most transforming trends such as Online Shopping. For more investing insights and to learn about the listed international companies benefitting from these trends, Register For A Free Trial Here.

The information does not take into account your personal objectives, financial situation or needs. You should consider if the relevant investment is appropriate having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.



October 8, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

BJade Ong

This article was submitted by AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com).

To learn more about the Online Shopping and other mega world trends, CLICK HERE.

AtlasTrend  is a global equities fund manager that makes it easy for anyone to invest in the world’s most transforming trends such as Online Shopping. For more investing insights and to learn about the listed international companies benefitting from these trends, register for a free trial here.



September 18, 2017 Elise Le-Galloudec

Have you online shopped in the last 12 months?

If you answered yes, then you are helping grow this multi-trillion dollar industry along with many others around the world.

But, how did the online shopping industry start? What does it have to do with a pizza? Is it recession proof? Most importantly, what will happen in the next 10 years?

Whether you work in the retail industry or you are a consumer, this should help answer those questions.

Click Here to download a high resolution version of the infographic (720KB).

 

This article was submitted by AtlasTrend (www.atlastrend.com).

To learn more about the Online Shopping and other mega world trends, CLICK HERE.

AtlasTrend is a global equities fund manager that makes it easy for anyone to invest in the world’s most transforming trends such as Online Shopping. For more investing insights and to learn about the listed international companies benefitting from these trends, register for a free trial here.